1 Executive Summary

This Area Profile presents a systematic overview of resident and road risk in Wokingham. The insight derived from this report can inform the design and development of road safety interventions, underpin local road safety strategies and support local authorities and their stakeholders to secure safer roads and healthier communities across the area. Area Profiles are compiled using analytical techniques which, not only compare long term trends but also use rate-based measures derived from a range of datasets.

Wokingham’s overall resident casualty figure has decreased gradually over the last ten years, particularly since 2015. Wokingham’s resident casualty rate was 38% lower than the national rate and 40% lower than the South- East regional rate. Resident casualty numbers have seen a steady downward trend since 2014. Half of Wokingham’s resident casualties are injured outside of the borough. Both the highest and over-represented number of Wokingham’s casualties are from mosaic type I36; stable families with children, renting higher value homes from social landlords. Wokingham’s resident casualties are most likely to come from the least deprived 10% of the population, however communities in the more deprived 40% and the less deprived 40% are over-represented as resident casualties, despite having lower numbers of resident casualties. Resident casualties have been broken down into the following cohorts:

  1. Resident child casualty numbers from Wokingham have seen a fluctuating but downward trend overall over the past decade, and despite the pandemic, numbers were virtually the same in 2020 and 2021. There has been one resident child fatality in the last decade, in 2020. Just over three-quarters of Wokingham’s resident child casualties were injured in Wokingham.
  2. Resident pedestrian casualty numbers rose steadily at the start of the decade, to a peak in 2014, and since then there has been a steady downward trend. However after a dramatic decrease in numbers in 2017, resident pedestrian casualty numbers have since plateaued at this level with minor fluctuation. Sixty-nine percent of Wokingham’s resident pedestrian casualties were injured in Wokingham.
  3. Resident pedal cyclist casualty numbers have decreased consistently over the last decade from their peak in 2012, with the only notable rise in numbers occurring in 2016. Resident pedal cyclist casualties did not decrease in the pandemic year of 2020 from previous years, as was the case with resident casualties overall. Sixty-four percent of Wokingham’s resident pedal cyclist casualties were injured in Wokingham.

The number of collision-involved resident drivers from Wokingham has decreased over the last ten years, but more so since 2015. The rate per 100,000 population was 45% below the national rate and 40% below the South-East regional rate. The rate for Wokingham was lower than that of Windsor and Maidenhead, Reading, Bracknell Forest and West Berkshire. It was significantly lower than that of Slough. Most of the collision involved drivers are of working age (17-65) and are more likely to come from communities of mosaic type B07, high achieving families living fast track lives, advancing careers, finances and their school-aged kid’s development. Collision-involved drivers of this mosaic type are under-represented relative to their population in Wokingham however, whereas Type G26, affluent families with growing children living in upmarket housing in city environs; Type G27, well-qualified older singles with incomes from successful professional careers in good quality housing; and Type H33, young families and singles setting up home in modern developments that are popular with their peers, are all over-represented relative to their populations in addition to featuring frequently as collision-involved resident drivers. Although they represent lower numbers of collision-involved resident drivers in Wokingham, drivers from communities of stable families with children, renting higher value homes from social landlords (Type I36) are significantly over-represented in collision involvement relative to their population.

An extra section has been added to this Area Profile to specifically look at young drivers (aged 17 to 24). There has been a steady downward trend in resident collision-involved younger drivers over the last decade, particularly from 2016 onwards. The rate per 100,000 population was 18% below the national rate and 27% below the South-East regional rate. Forty-four percent of Wokingham’s resident young drivers were involved in collisions in Wokingham.

The number of resident motorcycle riders involved in collisions has fluctuated notably over the last decade, with a peak in 2016. Half of these resident collision-involved motorcycle riders were involved in collisions on Wokingham’s roads. Wokingham’s resident motorcycle collision involvement rate was 43% below the national rate and 46% below the South-East regional rate.

As well as reviewing the risk to residents, this Area Profile has considered collision rates on the local road network. The number of collisions on Wokingham’s road network has decreased steadily over the last decade. However in 2021, numbers rose again slightly following the reduction in 2020 that coincided with pandemic-related travel. The collision rate per 100km of road on Wokingham’s road network was 16% below the national rate and 35% below the South-East regional rate. Wokingham’s collision rate was below the rate for Berkshire as a whole and was lower than all comparator authorities in Berkshire except West Berkshire.

Collision numbers on urban roads in Wokingham saw a downward trend over the last decade from 2015 onwards. However as with all roads, numbers rose again in 2021 following the reduction in 2020 that coincided with pandemic-related travel restrictions. This rise in 2021 brought collisions numbers back in line with pre-pandemic levels. The collision rate between 2017 and 2021 was less than half of both the national and South-East regional urban collision rates. Wokingham’s urban collision rate was 39% lower than the overall rate for Berkshire on urban roads. Analysis of the collision dynamics at the time of the collision show that 28% of collisions on urban roads involved no vehicle-to-vehicle impact. Where multiple vehicles were involved, 18% involved rear vehicle impacts; 9% involved side impacts; and 12% involved head-on impacts. The driver actions at the time of the collision show that the highest percentage of collisions on urban roads were when making a right turn, followed by a slow manoeuvre such as stopping.

Collision numbers on rural roads in Wokingham have been steadily falling over the last decade since 2014, Despite pandemic-related measures, the number of collisions has started to increase marginally year-on-year since 2019. The collision rate between 2017 and 2021 was 65% higher than the national rate, but 13% lower the South-East regional rate. Wokingham’s collision rate on rural roads was 12% higher than the overall rate for Berkshire. As with the rate for collisions on all roads, Wokingham’s collision rate on rural roads was the second lowest in Berkshire amongst comparator authorities, after West Berkshire. Analysis of the collision dynamics at the time of the collision show that almost a third of collisions on rural roads involved no vehicle-to-vehicle impact. Where multiple vehicles were involved, 21% involved rear vehicle impacts; 7% involved side impacts; and 9% involved head-on impacts. The driver actions at the time of the collision show that the highest percentage of collisions on urban roads involved run-off incidents, particularly run-offs to the nearside of the carriageway.

The factors that contribute towards collisions on Wokingham’s road network (CFs) are also measured. It is entirely possible that combination of factors led to a collision taking place, and the results do not produce figures that represent the number of incidents ‘caused’ by a single factor. Speeding, as measured by the factors ‘exceeding the speed limit’ or ‘travelling too fast for conditions’, has decreased gradually on Wokingham’s roads (with 2015 and 2020 as exceptions to the overall trend). Together, these factors still play a role in just under 9% of officer attended collisions in Wokingham, a percentage that is below the national and South-East percentages for speeding contributory factors.

The number of impairment CFs attributed, ‘impaired by alcohol’ or ‘impaired by drugs (illicit or medicinal)’, has fluctuated significantly over the last decade, appearing to show a downward trend up until 2016, after which point numbers have increased to levels seen at the start of the decade. Impairment CFs were attributed in 8.6% of officer attended collisions on Wokingham’s roads, a percentage that is notably higher than the national and South-East Regional percentages. Road surface contributory factors show a consistently declining trend in Wokingham, with at least one of these factor only attributed in 5.9% of Wokingham’s officer attended collisions. This is below the national and South-East regional percentages. Control error contributory factors also show a declining trend across the decade, however these CFs attributed in 16.4% of officer attended collisions, broadly in line with the national and South-East percentages. Whilst the number of unsafe behaviour contributory factors attributed, ‘aggressive driving’ or ‘careless, reckless or in a hurry’, has decreased moderately since the start of decade; 18.6% of officer-attended collisions were attributed an unsafe behaviour CF. This is higher than the national percentage but in line with the South-East regional percentage. Close following contributory factors have decreased dramatically, in particular after 2015, and were only allocated in 3.9% of officer attended collisions, a slightly lower proportion than those seen at the national and South-East regional levels. Medically unfit contributory factor numbers have fluctuated overall over the last decade, despite being only marginally higher in 2021 than they were in 2012. 4.2% of officer-attended collisions received a medically unfit CF, higher than both the national and South-East regional percentages. Distraction contributory factor numbers have also fluctuated over the past decade, but to a lesser extent, and were attributed to 6.5% of collisions attended by an officer, a markedly higher proportion than those seen nationally and in the South East Region.

In summary the road safety risk rates for Wokingham residents are, for the most part, lower than the national and regional norms and have decreased over the last ten years. Resident drivers have a lower risk rate than most of the comparator authorities.

2 Introduction

2.1 Overview

2.1.1 Background

Area Profiles from Agilysis provide overviews of road safety performance within specific local areas. This profile delivers detailed analysis and insight on all injury collisions reported to the police in Wokingham, as well as casualties and drivers involved in collisions anywhere in Britain who reside in Wokingham.

Area Profile formats are modular, which affords the flexibility to select topics for inclusion to reflect local needs and allows each section of the report to be used independently if required. Profile design allows authorities to understand general casualty and collision trends affecting their residents and roads, as well as selecting particular topics based on local issues. Experts from Agilysis work with commissioning authorities to ensure that selected topics provide an accurate and relevant assessment. After production of a first Area Profile, updates can be produced in future years covering the entire document or selected existing sections, whilst new topics can also be introduced in response to latest trends and concerns.

2.1.2 Aims and Objectives

The aim of this document is to provide a comprehensive profile of road safety issues affecting Wokingham’s road network and Wokingham’s residents, primarily using STATS19 collision data1 and Mosaic socio-demographic classification. Annual trends are presented and analysed for key road user groups, predominantly based on data from the last five full years of available statistics but referring to older figures where appropriate.

The Road Safety Analysis (RSA) analysis tool MAST Online has also been used to investigate trends for Wokingham’s residents involved in road collisions anywhere in the country, including socio-demographic profiling of casualties and drivers. MAST has been used to allow comparison of Wokingham’s key road safety issues with those of comparator regions and national figures. The aim is to allow Wokingham to assess its progress alongside other areas, and work together with neighbours to address common issues.

2.1.3 Analytical Techniques

The analytical techniques employed throughout this Area Profile are detailed in the Analytical Techniques section on page 5.1. Please refer to this section for information on the terminology and data sources used as well to understand methodologies utilised and the structure and scope of the report.

2.2 Profile Configuration

2.2.1 Structure

The Area Profile has been divided into separate analysis of key road user groups. The aim is to allow each section to be used independently if required. This will also allow Wokingham to update selected sections when appropriate, without a requirement to update the entire document.

Section 3 explores Resident Risk. Resident risk analysis includes examining all of Wokingham’s resident casualties and resident motor vehicle users in terms of rates, comparisons with other relevant police forces, constabularies and authorities; residency by small area; trends and socio-demographic analysis. Specific road user groups will also be analysed against these measures. The focus of this section is on how the people of Wokingham are involved in collisions, rather than what happens on local roads.

Section 4 provides analysis of Road Network Risk. It also examines rates; comparisons; location by small area; and trends on Wokingham’s roads. Breakdowns by rurality classification of road are also included in this section.

Section 5 includes Appendices detailing all Mosaic Types and the profile and distribution of specific Mosaic Types relevant to Wokingham. It also contains data tables for all analysis referred to in this Area Profile.

2.2.2 Scope

All figures included in this report are based on STATS 19 collision data. The residents section covers casualties and motor vehicle users involved in collisions who are residents of Wokingham, regardless of where in Britain the collision occurred. Resident analysis in this profile is based on the national STATS19 dataset as provided to Road Safety Analysis by the Department for Transport for publication in MAST Online over the five-year period between 2017 and 2021 inclusive. For a more complete explanation, please refer to 5.1.1 on methodology for calculating resident risk.

In contrast, the road network section covers collisions which occurred on Wokingham’s roads, regardless of where those involved reside. Network analysis is also based on the national STATS19 dataset over the five-year period between 2017 and 2021 inclusive. For a more complete explanation, please refer to 5.1.1 on methodology for calculating network collision risk.

3 Wokingham Resident Risk

For information about the provenance and scope of data included in this section, please refer to section 2.2.2. For an explanation of the methodologies employed throughout this section, please refer to 5.1.1.

3.1 Wokingham Resident Casualties

This section examines all casualties who were residents of Wokingham at the time of injury. For information about Wokingham’s resident motor vehicle users involved in collisions on all roads, please refer to section 3.2.

3.1.1 All Resident Casualties

3.1.1.1 Rates

Figure 3.1 shows the resident casualty rates for Wokingham compared to the national and regional rates, as well as the most similar comparators.

Between 2017 and 2021 Wokingham had a resident casualty rate of 138 casualties per year per 100,000 population.

Figure 3.1: Annual average Wokingham resident casualties per 100,000 population (2017 - 2021)

Annual average Wokingham resident casualties per 100,000 population (2017 - 2021)

3.1.1.2 Comparisons

Wokingham’s resident casualty rate was 38% lower than the national rate, 40% lower than the regional rate, and 20% below the rate for Berkshire as a whole. Within Berkshire, Wokingham ’s resident casualty rate was in line with that of West Berkshire and lower than the rates of Bracknell Forest, Reading, Slough and Windsor & Maidenhead. Wokingham’s resident casualty rate is lower than that of most similar comparator authorities but broadly similar to South Oxfordshire.

3.1.1.2.1 Residency by Small Area

Figure 3.2 shows the home location of the Wokingham’s resident casualties by lower layer super output area (LSOA). The thematic map is coloured by resident casualties per year per population of LSOA.

The highest resident casualty rates can be found around Wokingham town, Aborfield Green and around Suttons Business Park. There are also high resident casualty rates around Finchhampstead, Shinfield and Woodley.

Figure 3.2: Wokingham resident casualties home location by LSOA, casualties per year per 100,000 population (2017-2021)